Asian universities edge up world rankings – Nikkei Asian Review

U.S. President Barack Obama fields questions at Yangon University on Nov 14 2014 (Photo: Simon Roughneen)

JAKARTA — One of the world’s leading university ranking systems has found significant improvement in Asia’s tertiary education institutions over the past year, although long-established Western bodies continue to dominate the field in most key academic subjects. QS Quacquarelli Symonds, a London-based group, published its 2017 rankings covering 1,127 universities from 74 countries across 46 subjects. Harvard University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, described as “perennial rivals” by QS, led all universities in the field in 15 and 12 subjects, respectively. But the prominence of Asian universities has been increasing in recent years. While elite U.S. and European institutions are likely to remain at the top of the rankings in the near future, more Asian universities nonetheless are moving up the list, as regional economies grow and education spending increases. “It seems certain that Asia’s leading institutions will continue to strongly displace the second tier of North American and European institutions,” said QS research director Ben Sowter.

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Kuok scion pushes the second-hand gospel- Nikkei Asian Review

uiltless founder Yen Kuok speaking to the Nikkei Asian Review in Jakarta on Dec. 2 2016 (Photo: Simon Roughneen)

JAKARTA – Kuok said there was a downside to the faddish “start-up” ambitions expressed by other students. “People just said they would like to do start-ups, but often did not know exactly what,” she told the Nikkei Asian Review. “But for start-ups it should be that there is a need for something. You see the need, you do it yourself.” Guiltless was the product of Kuok’s love of fashion and the online start-up culture she encountered at Stanford. But it also showed that the 26-year-old has her father’s nose for a business opportunity. “In Hong Kong you have much less space, and less wardrobe space. When I moved back I had such a lot of items,” she recalled. “I said to myself that rather than just throw these out — such a waste — I’d like to sell these items online, give the money to charity. But to my surprise none of the top 10 second-hand luxury sites accepted items from outside Europe or North America.”

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Time to follow the money – The Edge Review

Student protestor in Yangon, seeking reform of Myanmar's education system (Photo: Simon Roughneen)

YANGON – In Myanmar, about 1.1 million kids start school each year in Myanmar, but of these only about 10 per cent finish high school, mostly those from cities and better-off families. Only one third of children from rural poor households manage to finish middle school. Such attrition makes it hard for companies who need educated, trained staff. “Businesses say that the second-biggest constraint to working in Myanmar is human resources,” said Christopher Spohr, an Asian Development Bank researcher.

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Myanmar education battleground sees a rare compromise – Nikkei Asian Review

Protestor seeking education reform marching in Yangon on Feb. 8 (Photo: Simon Roughneen)

YANGON – After 3 months of protest, a Feb. 10 deal on education reform allows activists help revise a divisive education law passed last year. Zaw Htay, a senior officer in President Thein Sein’s administration, told the Nikkei Asian Review that the deal between the government and the protestors was historic. “There has never been a compromise like this between the government and students in our history,” said Zaw Htay. But whether or not the education stand-off is over will depend on how parliamentarians react to the revised law. “So far, this is just a paper agreement, so we will wait and see what the parliament does,” lawyer Robert San Aung told the Nikkei Asia Review.

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School still out for some – The Edge Review

Class underway at Kachin Independence Army-run school in Mai Ja Yang, on the Burma-China border, Feb. 2012 (Photo: Simon Roughneen)

YANGON – “Our education system is really bad and we need to reform it,” Phyoe Phyoe Aung, a student union leader, told The Edge Review. “Before our education system was wholly controlled by the government, and that effect is still being felt,” added the 26 year old former political prisoner.

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Ireland pushes education ties with Vietnam in bid to court student market – Irish Independent

Ireland's Minister of State for Trade and Development Jan O'Sullivan and Vietnam's Minister of Education and Training Pham Vu Luan sign education MOU in Hanoi on Monday (Photo: Simon Roughneen)
http://www.independent.ie/lifestyle/education/latest-news/ireland-pushes-education-ties-with-vietnam-with-bid-to-attract-1500-third-level-students-2947369.html Simon Roughneen in Hanoi – Ireland and Vietnam today launched a deal aimed at increasing the number of...