Judicial storm-clouds hang over Thai economy, politics – Nikkei Asian Review

BANGKOK — Thailand’s bitter political divide widened this week after two separate rulings by legal institutions forced Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra from office and raised the possibility that she could be banned from politics for five years. The developments also cast doubt over Thai national elections planned for July 20 after the country’s Constitutional Court voided the results of an earlier poll on Feb. 2, citing disruptions by anti-government protesters that prevented the poll from being completed nationwide in a single day, as required by the country’s constitution. On May 7 the Constitutional Court ruled that Yingluck and nine ministers had abused their offices when reassigning the National Security Council secretary in 2011 — a reshuffle that paved the way for the brother-in-law of Yingluck’s elder brother, former Prime Minister Thaksin Shinwatra, to take the position of police chief.

Thailand court ousts prime minister after abuse-of-power verdict – Los Angeles Times

BANGKOK — In a controversial ruling that deepened Thailand’s political crisis, the country’s Constitutional Court on Wednesday ordered Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra to leave office, ruling that she abused her powers when she transferred a government official from his post three years ago. The court also demanded the removal of several of Yingluck’s cabinet ministers who it said were complicit in the transfer, throwing the status of her caretaker government into uncertainty ahead of elections scheduled for July. Shinawatra’s opponents had accused her of transferring the official, National Security Council head Thawil Pliensri, as part of a reshuffle aimed at installing a member of her influential family as police chief. Appearing in court on Tuesday, she denied any wrongdoing, saying she “never benefited from any transfer of civil servants.”

Thai politician turned protest leader follows own script in political drama – The Christian Science Monitor

PHUN PHIN, THAILAND – The politician’s house is hidden behind two giant billboards, one of Thailand’s revered monarch and the other of the crown prince. “Long Live the King. May it please Your Majesty the King, on behalf of Thaugsuban family,” read the signs. In this corner of southern Thailand’s rubber-growing heartland, respect for the royal family is strong. But so too is respect – some might say fear – of the family of Suthep Thaugsuban, a veteran politician and dealmaker who is the face of antigovernment protests in Bangkok. He is a key player in a complex drama that, at its core, pits a conservative elite against an arriviste billionaire. Last weekend’s parliamentary elections saw Mr. Suthep’s movement in full throttle: Protesters blocked polling stations in the capital in a bid to defeat Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra’s formidable political machine. In the south, an opposition stronghold, many districts had no candidates and hence no ballot.

A tale of two Thailands: Why the south will boycott Sunday’s election – The Christian Science Monitor

  http://www.csmonitor.com/World/Asia-Pacific/2014/0131/A-tale-of-two-Thailands-Why-the-south-will-boycott-Sunday-s-election http://gulfnews.com/news/world/other-world/a-tale-of-two-thailands-1.1285045 – syndicated to GulfNews SURAT THANI – For months antigovernment protesters have rallied in Bangkok, blockading roads,...

Protesters begin Bangkok ‘shutdown’ calling for Yingluck to step down – The Irrawaddy/BBC World Service: Outside Source

http://www.irrawaddy.org/asia/protesters-begin-bangkok-shutdown-calling-yingluck-step.html http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p01p2pd7 BANGKOK — Hundreds of thousands of protesters seeking an unelected council to run Southeast Asia’s second biggest...