Ireland aims for Vietnamese student market – Irish Independent

HANOI/KUALA LUMPUR – The Irish Government is again promoting Ireland as an education destination for Asian university students, with Minister of State for Trade and Development Joe Costello in Vietnam’s capital Hanoi on Monday meeting Vietnamese officials and students. “I want to encourage connections between Vietnam and Ireland and want to see more Vietnamese students come to study in Ireland,” Min. Costello said. 24 Vietnamese are currently enrolled in Ireland’s universities funded by Irish Government scholarships, with an alumni network of Vietnamese who studied in Irish universities now numbering over 100.

Inflation a concern as Vietnam’s small businesses struggle – The Diplomat

HO CHI MINH CITY – With the streetlights warming to a low glow outside as dusk turns to dark, Trang Hoang Yen is still running t-shirts through a sewing machine as most of her staff leave for home. “Normally we have a lot more workers, but the past year has been very hard for our sector,” she says, stopping work for a few minutes to talk.

For farmers and factory workers, rising prices offset gains from Vietnam’s growing economy – Asia Sentinel/RTÉ World Report

HO CHI MINH CITY– With average per capital annual incomes of just over US$1,000, Vietnam is officially a lower-middle income country. In Hanoi, the seat of government and commercial capital Ho Chi Minh City – still popularly known as Saigon – property prices are on an upward curve with new buildings sprouting-up faster than new growth in Vietnam’s lush tropical rainforests. But Vietnam must also address rising inflation, forecast by Standard Chartered Bank at 19.7 percent in December and with an 11.3 percent rise forecast for 2012. The Dong is expected to continue to depreciate throughout the year, given Vietnam’s US$8 billion current account deficit and low foreign currency reserves. With the State Bank of Vietnam attempting to sop up liquidity, tight monetary policy is starting to put pressure on the banking sector, with the result that some small banks have raised interest rates as high as 18 percent despite a request from the bank to keep it to 14 percent. 

Ireland pushes education ties with Vietnam in bid to court student market – Irish Independent

http://www.independent.ie/lifestyle/education/latest-news/ireland-pushes-education-ties-with-vietnam-with-bid-to-attract-1500-third-level-students-2947369.html Simon Roughneen in Hanoi – Ireland and Vietnam today launched a deal aimed at increasing the number of...

Land activists face prison in Vietnam – Asia Sentinel

HO CHI MINH CITY —  Late on a Tuesday evening, sitting four floors up in a Ho Chi Minh City cafe overlooking the city’s landmark opera house, a worried man who used the pseudonym Long had the look of someone who thought he was being watched. “I drove around the city for 45 minutes before heading here,” he said, hunched over and leaning forward on his seat in a restaurant that was almost empty. Looking around uneasily, he confided, “I wanted to make sure I wasn’t being followed.” At the heart of Long’s problems, and those of his fellow members of a Mennonite Church offshoot, are what they deem as unfair land seizures that see the government  turn over property over to companies as land for factories and apartments. Landowners frequently complain about unfair compensation and criticize the laws on land use, which they say are often abused by corrupt local officials.

Vietnam: a development success story? – The Guardian

HANOI — It’s 8am in Hanoi and already thousands of motorbikes, mopeds and scooters flow through the streets. Some sway with the weight of two or three passengers, boxes of merchandise, sacks of rice, or tied-down pieces of furniture that look heavier than vehicle and driver combined. vFor the first-time pedestrian, crossing the road is a daunting experience, but, amid all the apparent chaos, the “system” works. The trick is to just walk when you can, and let the torrent of bikes flow around you. Don’t look left, don’t look right. Just walk This functioning chaos contrasts sharply with the mostly prudent macroeconomic course that Vietnam has been taking. The Doi Moi, or “renovation” economic reforms were launched in 1986, emulating China’s move to open up its markets, after more than a decade of stagnation since the fall of Saigon to the Vietnamese communist forces.