BlackBerry hopes to power internet of things – Nikkei Asian Review

JAKARTA — For a decade or so before the market for touchscreen smartphones took off around 2010, BlackBerry’s hand-held communication devices were ubiquitous among thumb-jockeying executives trying to keep in touch with the office outside working hours. After several recent failed attempts to launch new phones and operating systems to compete against Apple, Google and Samsung Electronics products, the company that “made the modern cellphone,” as BlackBerry’s CEO John Chen puts it, is hoping to become the main supplier of secure applications and software for the next generation of internet-linked devices — the much- touted “internet of things” — from web-connected self-driving cars to “smart” domestic appliances that are expected to take off over the coming decade. “It’s going to be very much driven by securing end-point communications,” Chen told the Nikkei Asian Review. “We want to be the number one secure communications in IoT. We have signed a deal with Ford for seven years to help them build their next generation cars.”

Ireland has become a mecca for U.S. tech companies. Can Trump lure them home? – Los Angeles Times

DOONBEG — Every time President Trump rails against big “pharma” over the jobs that have been shipped overseas, his pledges to streamline regulations and lower taxes to lure them home prompt grimaces 3,000 miles across the Atlantic Ocean. More than 50,000 people are employed with pharmaceutical and medical device companies here in Ireland, with most of the companies refugees from America. Baxter, a medical equipment manufacturer based in Deerfield, Illinois, employs a thousand people in Ireland. Pfizer, Boston Scientific and Johnson & Johnson all have substantial Irish operations. Dublin’s Silicon Docks neighborhood earned its nickname after Facebook, Google, Twitter and other U.S. tech companies set up in glossy offices, often mammoth European headquarters, close to the River Liffey. They are among an estimated 700 U.S. companies which, attracted by Ireland’s low corporate tax rate and English-speaking work force, have helped drive a multinational invasion on the Emerald Isle that once turned it into the “Celtic Tiger” of Europe, employing around 170,000 people in all.