Australia on edge after close election – Nikkei Asian Review

MELBOURNE and SYDNEY — Australians were closely watching for results of their national election on Saturday night. Counting in the eastern states suggested a swing toward the opposition Labor Party after polls closed at 6 p.m. Eastern Standard Time. But as voting continued in the country’s west, results remained unclear, raising the prospect of a hung parliament in which no party would have an absolute majority. By 11:45 p.m. Sydney time, Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull had not arrived at a governing party post-election event held at a posh Sydney hotel. Former Liberal Party Prime Minister John Howard spoke to media at the event, saying he was disappointed at seat losses in the election, but said “it is for the prime minister to speak on behalf of the coalition” regarding the overall election outcome. For much of the protracted, 55-day election campaign, Turnbull’s Liberal-National party coalition — which stormed to power at the 2013 election — was tipped to enjoy a narrow victory. But a late surge of support for Labor in opinion polls in the final days gave opposition leader Bill Shorten, a former trade union boss, reason to be optimistic.

Tight Australia poll may give minnows balance of power – Nikkei Asian Review

SYDNEY – On the eve of voting Australia’s July 2 national elections looks set to produce a hung parliament, raising the prospect of a raft of smaller parties and independents winning seats, and precipitating lengthy horse-trading before a government can be formed. By June 30, almost 2.5 million people had taken part in the early voting system set up for people unable to vote on July 2. One of those early voters, David Le, a 34-year-old banker, said that “in a time when the country is stable but the main political parties are not, people are going to look for alternatives.” “In common with much of the rest of the western world, there is a general skepticism about the ethics and morality of politics, and in Australia in particular the frequent deposing of prime ministers,” said John Warhurst. “What we are seeing in the opinion polls is increased votes for the minor parties, but often that’s used to cast a protest,” Albanese, told the Nikkei Asian Review. But Albanese, the shadow minister for infrastructure, transport, cities and tourism, conceded that possible gains for smaller parties remained “one of the great unknowns” of the July 2 election. He would not be drawn on whether a strong showing for the Greens and other independents could help Labor form a coalition. “We’re aiming to govern in our own right, 76 seats, that’s the aim.” Asked if he thought smaller parties would fare as well as opinion polls suggest, Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull said: “Tomorrow the Australian people will tell us emphatically and decisively.”