Southeast Asia grapples with resurgence of ‘traditional’ piracy – Nikkei Asian Review

JAKARTA – During the first six months of 2015, pirates launched an attack once every two weeks on average in Southeast Asian waters, according to the International Chamber of Commerce’s International Maritime Bureau. “We have been busy, getting many calls, emails, even faxes,” Noel Choong, head of the IMB’s Piracy Reporting Center in Kuala Lumpur, told the Nikkei Asian Review. The center was set up in 1992 as “a 24-hour and free service for shipmasters to report any piracy, armed robbery or stowaway incidents,” according to the IMB website. The increase in the number of incidents marks a return to the period between the early 1990s and 2006 when Southeast Asia was the most “pirate infested” region in the world, according to the IMB. It was subsequently overtaken by an upsurge in deadly attacks and hijackings in the waters off Somalia and East Africa, where ship crews were sometimes held captive for years.