Neglect of chronic diseases heightened by pandemic response – dpa international

Social distancing markers on floor of Dublin supermarket (Simon Roughneen)

DUBLIN — Most countries are failing to curb non-communicable diseases such as diabetes and cancer, according to research published in The Lancet, a British medical journal, which said the situation has been made worse by coronavirus-related disruptions to health systems. Only six countries are on track to reduce deaths from such conditions, including heart disease and chronic respiratory disease, by a third by 2030, according to the report, referencing commitments made in 2015 as part of the UN’s “Sustainable Development Goals.” The novel coronavirus pandemic has “disrupted the regular care often required by patients” affected by non-communicable diseases, who are in turn among the most vulnerable to serious illness if infected with the virus, which can cause a disease known as Covid-19.

Street party sharpens row about virus restrictions in Ireland – dpa international

Pints of Guinness served on June 29 2020 as Ireland allows some pubs to reopen after almost 4 months closure due to coronavirus (Simon Roughneen)

CASTLEBAR — Another spat about coronavirus curbs has erupted in Ireland, days after Phil Hogan was forced to resign as the European Union’s trade chief for flouting rules while visiting his homeland. Revellers seen drinking on the streets of Killarney, a tourist-draw town in Ireland’s south-west, were branded “disgraceful” by Mayor Brendan Cronin after footage was posted online. Health official Paul Reid said the scenes were “unfortunate,” while Simon Harris, a former health minister, said “there will always be people who do stupid things.” The weekend hedonism in Killarney could have been avoided, said Michael Healy-Rae, an independent parliamentarian from the area, if Ireland’s coronavirus curbs were relaxed to allow pubs reopen. “If our public houses are open, people will get alcohol in a measured and sensible way,” Healy-Rae told public broadcaster RTÉ.

Irish minister quits but EU commissioner defiant after apparent breach of virus curbs – dpa international

DUBLIN — Ireland’s agriculture minister resigned on Friday after seemingly flouting anti-coronavirus measures introduced earlier in the week by the government. Prime Minister Micheál Martin said former minister Dara Calleary’s appearance at a Wednesday golf event and dinner was “wrong and an error of judgement.” In a Friday statement, Martin said the event “should not have gone ahead in the manner it did given the government decision of last Tuesday.” Calleary told Mid West Radio, a local broadcaster in his Mayo constituency, that Martin was “entitled to be angry and disappointed.” Ireland’s police said that they were investigating the event over “alleged breaches” of health laws.

UN tourism agency knocks ‘timid’ leaders, says safe travel possible – dpa international

Before the pandemic and restrictions, scenes such as this in Melaka, a town in southern Malaysia that is a popular tourist destination, were common (Simon Roughneen)

LIMERICK — The World Tourism Organization (UNWTO), a United Nations agency, on Tuesday criticized governments for being “overly focused” on health and described as “not enough” the “re-opening of borders to tourism” seen to date. The agency wants governments “to do everything they can to get people travelling again,” citing the “the sudden and rapid fall in tourist arrivals” caused by the novel coronavirus pandemic. Governments have a “responsibility to protect businesses and livelihoods,” the Madrid-based agency said, pointing to estimates published in July that showed the collapse in travel between January and May as having cost up to 320 billion dollars – three times the losses to tourism incurred during the 2007-09 financial crisis and equivalent to Colombia’s gross domestic product.

Irish government reimposes some virus curbs on midlands region – dpa international

Hand sanitiser near the entrance of a church in Ireland (Simon Roughneen)

DUBLIN — A resurgence of coronavirus cases in parts of Ireland has prompted the government to stop residents of three adjoining counties from travelling elsewhere in the country for two weeks. Prime Minister Micheál Martin announced the curbs in a Friday evening press conference, saying that “over the past week, there have been a number of localised clusters, which are of serious concern.” The restrictions affect counties Laois and Offaly, as well as Kildare – a densely-populated county that is part of the commuter belt ringing capital Dublin. The almost 400,000 people living in three counties can only travel elsewhere in Ireland – which recorded a population of 4.76 million in the 2016 census – for work or “essential” purposes such as medical treatment. 

No sweat for British scientists sniffing out cause of body odour – dpa international

Antiperspirants for sale in Dublin pharmacy (Simon Roughneen)

DUBLIN — Researchers at the University of York in Britain have found a “unique” enzyme deemed responsible “for the pungent characteristic smell we call body odour or BO.” The research, published Monday in the journal Scientific Reports, describes a “BO enzyme” that occurs in a handful of bacteria and causes “the characteristic armpit odour” that has in turn spawned a lucrative market in deodorants and antiperspirants. The research was carried out by the university in partnership with the research and development wing of Unilever, an Anglo-Dutch conglomerate that counts among its brands the antiperspirant Axe, Lifebouy soaps and Lux perfumes. Michelle Rudden of the University of York’s Department of Biology said the discovery marks “a key advancement in understanding how body odour works,” which in turn “will enable the development of targeted inhibitors.”

World population growth to tail off, changing global balance of power – dpa international

Pedestrians on Grafton Street in Dublin (Simon Roughneen)

DUBLIN — Long-term predictions about global demographic expansion will prove overblown as deeper shifts reshape geopolitics, according to projections published on Wednesday in The Lancet, a British medical journal. The world’s population will increase from the current 7.8 billion to a peak of 9.7 billion by 2064, before falling back to 8.8 billion by the century’s end, going by newly-published modelling undertaken by academics from the University of Washington (UWA). The trends suggest that China’s 2017 population of 1.4 billion could drop to 730 million – steeper than UN projections, which give China a population of around one billion in 2100. Sub-Saharan Africa’s population is on track to triple to 3.07 billion, leading to it becoming an “increasingly powerful continent on the geopolitical stage.” Though China will overtake the US as the world’s biggest economy by 2035, the US will reclaim top spot decades later, after China’s working-age population plummets to 350 million.

A bit different: Ireland’s pubs reopen but under new pandemic rules – dpa international

Pints of Guinness served on June 29 2020 as Ireland allows some pubs to reopen after almost 4 months closure due to coronavirus (Simon Roughneen)

CLAREMORRIS — Some of Ireland’s pubs were pouring pints on Monday for the first time in nearly four months as the country lifts most coronavirus-related restrictions. Speaking over the evening chatter of customers in The Western, a pub and hotel in Claremorris – a town of around 4,000 people in the west of Ireland – manager Patrick Mitchell said “we had no idea what to expect today, we have been quite busy, but it is a bit different.” Patrons are allowed one hour and 45 minutes drinking-time in bars that serve food – as long as they splash out on a “substantial meal” priced at 9 euros (10 dollars) or more and adhere to social distancing requirements. Inside The Dalton Inn, about 100 metres down the street from The Western, owner Andrew Cooper said “we’re sticking strictly to those rules.” The regime means that only bigger pubs equipped with kitchens will reopen for now – with the food tab so far a deterrent to would-be punters.

As pandemic fades in Ireland, uncertainty around reopening of churches – dpa international

DUBLIN — Ireland plans to allow public religious ceremonies again from Monday, despite confusion over how many people can attend and over how new rules will apply to places of worship. Starting next week, a maximum of 50 people can meet indoors as part of the latest roll-back of curbs imposed in March to stem to spread of the novel coronavirus pandemic in Ireland. After Diarmuid Martin, the Catholic archbishop of Dublin, described the proposed blanket 50-person ceiling as “strange” and “disappointing,” outgoing Prime Minister Leo Varadkar said on Thursday that “a specific protocol” based on the seating capacity of places of worship “is going to be worked out” with religious authorities.

Irish health care workers among world’s worst-affected by the coronavirus pandemic – dpa international

DUBLIN — Ireland’s front line medics have been hit harder than counterparts elsewhere by the novel coronavirus pandemic, the head of the country’s main nurses’ union said during a parliamentary hearing on Tuesday. Addressing the Dáil (parliament) Special Committee on Covid-19 Response, Irish Nurses and Midwives Organisation (INMO) general secretary Phil Ní Sheaghdha said the country has the world’s highest rate of infection among health care workers.
Ireland’s Department of Health has confirmed 25,383 coronavirus cases since February 29, with 8,161 of those diagnosed among health care workers. Ní Sheaghdha described the numbers as an “absolute scandal” and warned that hospitals are facing staffing shortages.