Late football hero Charlton gets unique Anglo-Irish stamp of approval – dpa international

Mail delivery van in Ireland (Simon Roughneen)

DUBLIN — A first-ever joint postmark will be used on mail sent from England and Ireland in memory of the late football player and manager Jack Charlton, who died on July 10 aged 85. Featuring an image of a football and reading “Jack Charlton, 1935 – 2020,” the postmark will be applied until August 9, the British and Irish postal services announced Monday. Charlton was a central defender on the England team that won the World Cup in 1966 and later managed the Irish national team that reached the quarter-finals at their World Cup debut in 1990. David McRedmond, CEO of Ireland’s An Post, described Charlton as “an English hero who became an Irish legend” during a Monday launch event with former Ireland defender Paul McGrath. 

Ireland’s alcoholic curse – OpenDemocracy

Does the answer lie in the past? Under British rule, particularly before the Great Famine in the 1840s, the manufacture of absinthe-potency alcohol known as poitín was a nationwide illegal cottage industry requiring little technical expertise or equipment. This quasi-hallucinogenic brew was widely popularised as both a symbol of defiance of British rule (the Royal Irish Constabulary and its antecedents had special units designed to stamp out the industry/custom, which were met with ingenious schemes to maintain underground production) and a quick, cheap means of getting hammered.